Clean Eatingwellness

Is Tofu Bad For You?

What do you think of when you hear the word “Tofu“? To “veggie”? To “proteins”? To “soy“? On “diet“? Or to “healthy food“? Anyway, the tofu is talking about it … So much so that it is sometimes difficult to know what it really is. What is it made of? Is Tofu Bad For You? What are its real benefits? Is it easy to cook? And is it a great alternative to replace meat on your plates? If you are a vegetarian or just want to get to know him better, WE share 13 Facts you absolutely need to know about it and then you can decide if is Tofu bad for you or not.

Is Tofu Bad For You? Check 13 Facts About it

Air Fryer Garlic Parmesan Brussels Sprouts😘😘 2 buzzrecipes- Birria Tacos, Korean bbq

1 / Tofu is from Japan

1 Tofu is from Japan-img01

False. It was in China that tofu first appeared over 2,000 years ago. In fact, soybeans are, like wheat, rice, barley, and millet, originating there. Tofu did not appear in Europe until the beginning of the 20th century. Little known when it was introduced, it really gained momentum thanks to the development of vegetarian cuisine. As for the word “tofu”? It comes from the Japanese “tōfu”, which itself derives from the Chinese “dòufu” and which can be analyzed morphologically as “bean rot”. Etymologically, “to” means “bean” and “fu”, “to mass”.

2 / Tofu is Made from Soy Beverage

2 Tofu is Made from Soy Beverage-img02

True. Originally from China, tofu is a legume. Its basic ingredient is yellow soybean. This releases a whitish liquid when it is soaked and crushed. To make tofu, this liquid is used, which is curdled and pressed. This method is equivalent to that of cow’s milk to produce cheese. This is why we sometimes call tofu “soy cheese”.

3 / There are several varieties of Tofu

3 / There are several varieties of Tofu-img03

True . Depending on the manufacturing process used, there are several types of tofu. However, two of its varieties are commonly used in cooking, which are block tofu and silken tofu.

Block tofu is the most common type of tofu found in stores. Its texture is a little soft and grainy; its appearance is comparable to that of a cheese. It can be soft, medium, firm or extra-firm. It has the particularity of absorbing the flavors of the foods with which it is mixed. It is therefore often marinated before cooking. This tofu can also be bought already flavored in the store. We find smoked tofu, tofu with basil, tofu with olives, mango-curry tofu, tofu with pesto, for example.

Silken tofu is another type of tofu that is also readily available in stores. It looks like bulk tofu, but it is more tender and delicate. If not handled with care, it can crumble into pieces. It can be soft, firm or extra firm. It is particularly suitable for making sauces and desserts.

4 / The proteins in Tofu are of better quality than the proteins contained in meat

4 / The proteins in Tofu are of better quality than the proteins contained in meat-img04

False. Protein is one of the seven basic constituents of our diet along with carbohydrates and fats. They are made up of 20 amino acids that the body needs daily to function at its maximum capacity. Of these 20 amino acids, 9 are said to be “essential” because they are not synthesized by the body. In other words, they can only be provided by food, and therefore by the proteins that we consume. In fact, proteins of vegetable origin are not of as good quality as those of animal origin, contained in meat for example, because they do not contain all the essential amino acids in the optimal proportions for our body.

However, there are exceptions such as vegetable proteins from soybeans, considered to be “of high biological value”, that is to say having all nine amino acids. The proteins in tofu, made exclusively from soybeans, therefore contain these nine amino acids. They are said to be “complete” and are therefore of the same quality as proteins of animal origin … unlike their quantity! 100 g of tofu contain 10 g of protein (vegetable) while 100 g of meat provides 20 g of protein (animal). Note that the vegetable proteins present in tofu are absorbed at 95% in the intestine. By comparison, the proteins contained in other legumes are absorbed at 35% in the intestine.

Tofu proteins are therefore easily assimilated by the body.

Add to this that the soy drink contains only 3.7 g of vegetable protein per 100 g. The proteins in tofu, made exclusively from soybeans, therefore contain these nine amino acids. They are said to be “complete” and are therefore of the same quality as proteins of animal origin … unlike their quantity! 100 g of tofu contain 10 g of protein (vegetable) while 100 g of meat provides 20 g of protein (animal). Note that the vegetable proteins present in tofu are absorbed at 95% in the intestine. By comparison, the proteins contained in other legumes are absorbed at 35% in the intestine. Tofu proteins are therefore easily assimilated by the body *. Add to this that the soy drink contains only 3.7 g of vegetable protein per 100 g.

The proteins in tofu, made exclusively from soybeans, therefore contain these nine amino acids. They are said to be “complete” and are therefore of the same quality as proteins of animal origin… unlike their quantity! 100 g of tofu contain 10 g of protein (vegetable) while 100 g of meat provides 20 g of protein (animal). Note that the vegetable proteins present in tofu are absorbed at 95% in the intestine. By comparison, the proteins contained in other legumes are absorbed at 35% in the intestine. Tofu proteins are therefore easily assimilated by the body .

Add to this that the soy drink contains only 3.7 g of vegetable protein per 100 g. They are said to be “complete” and are therefore of the same quality as proteins of animal origin … unlike their quantity! 100 g of tofu contain 10 g of protein (vegetable) while 100 g of meat provides 20 g of protein (animal). Note that the vegetable proteins present in tofu are absorbed at 95% in the intestine. By comparison, the proteins contained in other legumes are absorbed at 35% in the intestine.

Also Read : Does Tofu Go Bad?

5 / Tofu can Only be Eaten Cooked

5 / Tofu can Only be Eaten Cooked-img05

False. Whether lumpy or silky, tofu is not cooked strictly speaking, but heats up and firms up under the effect of heat. Block tofu, whether more or less firm, is eaten raw as well as cooked. It is integrated in small cubes in mixed salads, it is incorporated in soups, soups or mashed potatoes, it is marinated and then sautéed, accompanied by various vegetables and raw vegetables or prepared in the manner of scrambled eggs, for example.

Silky tofu is best eaten in a sauce (hot or cold) or incorporated into various desserts such as cakes, desserts, and mousses. Beaten with oil and vinegar, it makes it possible to concoct for example a vegetable “mayonnaise”. You can also whip it with a little vanilla and sugar to obtain a vegetable mousse to serve with fruit.

6 / Tofu Has No Taste

6 / Tofu Has No Taste-img06

True and false. Plain bulk tofu has no odor and has a fairly neutral flavor, but it’s a real plus! For what reasons? Because we flavor and season it as desired in the kitchen. Vinaigrette, soy sauce, mustard sauce, or sesame puree-based sauce (…), it lends itself to all kinds of marinades and “absorbs” its taste. The same goes for the silken tofu; we perfume it according to our desires and tastes.

7 / Tofu Contains little Iron

7 / Tofu Contains little Iron-img07

False. Tofu is one of the best sources of iron from plant sources, known as “non-heme” iron. 100g of tofu contains approximately 2.9 mg of iron. However, red meat is the best-known source of heme iron, that is, iron from animal sources. This type of iron is on average three times better absorbed by the body than iron from plant sources.

The best meat product rich in iron is black pudding; 100 g contain 17 mg of iron In addition, it is recommended to combine tofu with foods rich in vitamin C (broccoli, peppers, parsley, kiwi, orange, etc.) in the plates in order to improve the absorption of its iron which is present there.

8 / You can Be Allergic To Tofu

8 / You can Be Allergic To Tofu-img08

True. This is all the more true for soybeans. Soy allergy is not very common, however, it causes real adjustment problems in the daily life of people who are intolerant to it. Usually, people who suffer from it are also allergic to other legumes like peanuts or lupine. We then speak of cross allergies. Either way, the symptoms are more or less severe and often appear within ten minutes of eating soy. Among them, we find generalized hives, swelling of the face or throat, an asthma attack, vomiting, a feeling of discomfort or a sudden drop in blood pressure. We accept !

9 / ORGANIC tofu may contain GMOs

9 / ORGANIC tofu may contain GMOs-img09

False . Nowadays, the craze around soybean has become in a few years one of the most traded agricultural commodities in the world. Therefore, it is true that soy is a risky ingredient and that it can be genetically modified. This is particularly the case in the United States, Argentina and Brazil. Nevertheless, soybean traceability remains good and organic soy products, found in France, are certified GMO-free *. This is also true for organic tofu, whether it is block or silky.

In accordance with the organic regulations in force

10 / In infants, soybean drink can replace cow’s milk in case of allergy to animal proteins

False. 25-30% of infants intolerant to cow’s milk protein are also allergic to the soy proteins found in soy drinks. As for the remaining 65 to 70%? They do not benefit from the calcium intake present in animal milk since the soy beverage naturally does not contain calcium (compared to 120 mg of calcium per 100 ml of cow’s milk). The solution ? Opt for milk replacements.

11 / Tofu is an endocrine disruptor

11 / Tofu is an endocrine disruptor-img11

True and false.An endocrine disruptor is a chemical of natural or artificial origin that can interfere with the functioning of the endocrine glands, the organs responsible for secreting hormones in the human body. It can either mimic the action of a natural hormone and thus induce the response due to this hormone, or prevent a hormone from attaching to its receptor and thus prevent the transmission of the hormonal signal, or either disrupt the production or regulation of hormones or their receptors.

Soybeans (the base of tofu) contain special molecules called “isoflavones” or “phytoestrogens” which are similar to human estrogen and have mild hormonal activity. However, a large amount must be ingested for it to have this endocrine-disrupting effect! According to the National Agency for Food and Occupational Health Security (ANSES), soy, and therefore tofu, can be consumed without excess by adults as part of a healthy, varied, and balanced diet. Consumption should be avoided for children and infants and limited for pregnant women.

12 / You can make Tofu yourself

True. Making tofu yourself is easy! To do this, simply add a coagulant in the soy drink to allow it to curdle. This coagulant will slightly influence the flavor of the tofu produced. This can be magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, apple cider vinegar, or even lemon juice. Homemade tofu recipes are plentiful on the web.

13 / Tofu contains Gluten

False. Soy is naturally gluten-free. Foods made with soybeans, such as tofu, tempeh, miso, mung beans (bean sprouts), or soy beverage are therefore gluten-free. Only the traditional “soy sauce” contains it.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button